Preventing Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) requires a range of efforts from general awareness to targeted prevention and treatment services. In the Canadian Four-Part FASD Prevention Model, Level 3 and 4 programs work to provide low barrier holistic services for pregnant or parenting women who have substance use, mental health and/or trauma-related issues and face many related health and social challenges.

The Co-Creating Evidence Evaluation Project (CCE) was a multi-site evaluation of eight community-based programs located across Canada that support women in the prevention of FASD through harm reduction oriented, trauma informed, culturally safe and women centered approaches. With programs located in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Nova Scotia, this four-year evaluation project (2017-2020) had three main research questions:

  1. What are the common elements of the diverse Level 3 programs across Canada?
  2. What program components are helpful from women’s perspectives?
  3. What are best measures to evidence outcomes and what outcomes are being achieved?

The Centre of Excellence has been fortunate to work in partnership with Nota Bene Consulting Group on the CCE study. From this project, resources for service providers, researchers, and policy makers alike have been created to highlight key findings and share promising practices.

Key Resources:

Funding for this project has been received from the Public Health Agency of Canada, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) National Strategic Project Fund. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of the Public Health Agency of Canada.